How can I reuse or recycle … onion or orange nets?

Onions in a netWe tend to buy 1kg or 2kg nets of onions – plastic nets, with 1cmx1cm ish holes – but can’t think what to do with them once we’ve finished the pack. The same goes for the rare occasions when we buy big packs of oranges or lemons.

We use smaller nets – the type that garlic comes in at the supermarket – to make little bird feeders to hang in trees but the nuts and seeds mix we use falls out of the bigger holes in the onion/orange/lemon nets.

Any suggestions how we can use them again?

(Photo by upn)

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17 Responses to “How can I reuse or recycle … onion or orange nets?”


  1. Hi,

    I know these nets are great for making dish scrubbies, you just bunch them all up and srub away… they can also be used for bagging up bath toys or beach toys and then just washing them with a hose or in the sink.

  2. dancing girl says:

    I have used them for protecting strawberries from hungry birds. Just prop them up on short sticks.

  3. Amanda Kerik says:

    Depending on the size of the hole you cut, these are great in the shower to hold bits and pieces that tend to disappear.

    I double them up and stretch them over sponges for scrubbing (dishes or skin)

    You can probably use them in the wash for delicates, depending on the quality.

    Use them as a giant sieve – to allow liquids to drip out of mini composts (if you’re into that kind of thing)

  4. Heather says:

    I use the fine net ones (from garlic) for beach combing, as it holds tiny shells…and then you just rinse the whole bag under water to get rid of sand.

    The larger orange net bags I use under the sink to stuff plastic bags in.

    Orange net bags are also handy when camping for all sorts of things…. collecting stuff, organizing, and as recyclabling bags.

  5. Leah says:

    At the nature center we tape them to pieces of cardboard, then use it to make rubbings with paper and a crayon. Looks just like snake skin!

  6. renee says:

    You can make groovy shopping bags out of the huge orange bags. I also sew/weave wool through them to make warm winter cushions and funky handbags.

  7. Desi says:

    Mushroom collectors use them so that the spores drop back onto the ground and reseed.

  8. ron says:

    I fill them up with the stuff you get out of the vacum cleaner and the fluff collected in the tumble drier and hang it up for the birds to use as nesting material

    • Liz says:

      I used to put out the drier fluff as well, but stopped as I heard that the chemicals from dryer sheets that end up in it isn’t good for the birds.

  9. Gulia says:

    Wrap couple of them around the head of a sunflower, when it developed seeds, so birds don’t get them.

  10. Bad Monkey says:

    Get some old bacon fat/strips of bacon and tie it up, then use it on your crab line instead of hooks, took my kids crab fishing off harbour wall and this was great bait, didn`t need hooks, and didn`t need to keep rebaiting. Or use it as a bird feeder with melted fat/seeds/scraps in the garden.

  11. Michele says:

    I use them for washing baby bottle nipple and rings in the dishwasher. It keeps them from falling thru.
    I also use them as recycled produce bags along with my reusable shopping bags. They don’t weigh anymore than the plastic produce bags and you can reuse them!

  12. I am hoping to use these in a class at Fact in Liverpool to make Fascinators with sequins made from toothpast tubes but got to experiment yet!

  13. Emily says:

    Hadn’t thought of using them for protecting plants from the birds. I shall have to save them and see what I can do with them.

  14. Petra says:

    I use the tiny one from garlic to fill with little pieces of soap, so you can use these to the end.

  15. Yvonne says:

    1)After collected many of them, I tied them all up to make a ring. Kids in kindergarten like to keep themselves in the circle.

    2) I rolled it up layer by layer until the end and make it into an apple or bell pepper. Nice for decoration.

  16. Triskele says:

    Great for storing winter bulbs with some material as padding to keep the bulbs separated.



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