How can I reuse or recycle out-of-date Weetabix?

a weetabix wheat biscuitWe’ve had an email from Jenna to our Compost This address:

I just found a box of Weetabix in my kitchen cupboard that went off last April! Can I compost it?

In a basic, non-sealed compost bin/heap, one of the general rules is avoid putting anything in there that might attract vermin. While I certainly wouldn’t put milk-soaked cereal in there, crushed dry Weetabix should be ok – it’s even recommended in some circles as a starter food for wormeries.

(Another general rule of compost heaps is keep it balanced and well mixed, so keep that in mind if you’ve got a lot of the wheat biscuits to get rid of.)

Aside from composting though, are there any old uses for out of date Weetabix? I have a half memory of a facial scrub/mask thing using Weetabix but a search doesn’t show anything up. Anyone know?

Best Suggestions

  • Reduce: Keep breakfast cereals like Weetabix in a sealed plastic container to avoid them getting soggy from the general moisture in your kitchen.
  • Recycle: Dry Weetabix can be added to wormeries or compost heaps as a “brown”. Chickens and wild birds are also a lot less fussy than we are about what is stale and what isn’t!
  • See the comments below for more suggestions and ideas

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10 Responses to “How can I reuse or recycle out-of-date Weetabix?”


  1. Bellen says:

    Call the Weetabix company and see if it’s okay to still eat. It may need to be freshened by heating in the oven, like you’d fix stale crackers. I doubt there is anything in Wheetabix to spoil to the point you’d get sick eating it.

  2. Nicole says:

    I’ve put dry cereal in my compost, to help balance out the “green items” and it worked like a charm. I have another expired box on standby for the next time I need more “brown items”

  3. Lizzy says:

    Unless it has actually got mould on it, it’s probably just stale. If you don’t fancy eating it you could leave it out as food for birds, you could use it in any home-made cream as an exfoliant if you crush it. it would also be good in home made soaps. just get any recipe and add it in.
    hope this helps =D

  4. kelvin says:

    Weetabix in fact has a 18month life from production so it is ok to eat…..

  5. Rie says:

    Why don’t you turn it into a boat?

  6. Alan Fuller says:

    I suggest that you put them at the bottom of your bbq give them a shot of lighter fluid cover with charcol and light,they burn very well and i always use them

  7. John de Lange says:

    You couod buy a lot more and build an insulated house, make sure you paint the outside to keep the rain off.

  8. Olia says:

    If it is wrapped , save it for future generations, as an example of food we it presently. I bet it will worth some money 40 years later.

  9. Madilyn says:

    Crush them and mix them with the sort of white paste used in primary schools. Take the mixture and form a doughnut shape. To colour, there are two options – add a bit of green food dye or paint while mixing the paste/wheat mixture, or (I prefer this method) paint it once it’s dry. Ad a little ribbon bow and a loop for hanging. Voila! Wreath ornaments!

  10. Sonia says:

    Hi,
    I suggest you use it to make a face mask. I’m not sure exactly how to make it, but here’s how I do it:
    1. Take a clean bowl and put 2 Weetabix into the bowl. Crumple the up.

    2. Add half a cup of milk. Stir until you get a paste, not too mushy, yet not too thick.

    3. Add your favorite facial mask ingredients that you think will go well with Weetabix. I like to add: yoghurt, fresh fruit, egg white. Just add anything that’s leftover, as long as it goes together with Weetabix!

    4. Mix in a blender until you see a nice floaty paste forming.

    5. That’s it! Apply with your fingertips or a small brush. Leave for 15 min.



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