How can I reuse or recycle a (Clorox) wipe dispensing container?

We’ve had an email from Cassondra asking:

How can I reuse/recycle clorox wipes containers?

I hadn’t heard of Clorox wipes but my friend Google tells me they’re the same type of dispensing containers used for many types of wipes (baby wipes, screen cleaning wipes, etc). Like with all disposable wipes, the first thing I’d say is reduce your use of them if you can. Use a washable/reusable cloth instead – either a standard dishcloth or a specially designed cloth for use with just water, no additional chemicals needed.

But to answer the question in hand, chances are, you can recycle the container with your standard plastic recycling. I’m not 100% sure about Clorox ones but most of the ones I’ve come into contact with and checked have been made from polyethylene (PE) plastic, which is widely recyclable.

As for reuses, without any modification at all, they’re good string, twine or yarn dispensers in the garden or for crafts – the container protects the yarn from the elements/cat-attack and you just pull it out as you need it. You probably won’t need more than a couple of those though so any other ideas?

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9 Responses to “How can I reuse or recycle a (Clorox) wipe dispensing container?”


  1. Chris says:

    Fill with water and some other stinky material. Hang next to the chicken coup and catch flies.

  2. megan says:

    this:

    http://www.recyclart.org/2009/02/colorful-lights/

    I think the opening that the wipes come out of could theoretically be perfect to push the small light bulbs through.

  3. Most of them work fine with cloth wipes. If you fold your cloth wipes together just so and pre-wet them with cleaning solution, they will even feed through the top like the disposable wipes did.

  4. My best idea would be to use it in a graphic design project or as some sort of storage container. I have a stock pile of random containers, boxes and paper bags for my Senior Design class next semester.

    http://feliciafollum.blogspot.com/2010/12/aurum-brewery.html – graphic design project. I always have a stock pile of random containers like this. They are perfect for various packaging ideas.

    If you are not a designer you could take the same idea and spray paint the container and use it as storage for pens, pencils, bottle caps or other miscellaneous objects that get thrown around the house. If you look at any of the labels in the post, you could do the same thing and create nice labels for the containers…Anyways, this is the best idea I have so far…good luck and if nothing else enjoy the graphic design project.

  5. Patti says:

    They would make excellent containers to collect sharps (stick pins and diabetic needles for example).

  6. JB says:

    Use them to hold plastic shopping bags. I recycle the bags for waste basket liners but storing them can be a pain. So rinse out and dry the dispenser. Then stuff your plastic bags in there for easy storage and dispensing.

  7. MARIA says:

    I USE MINE FOR STORING PLASTIC GROCERY BAGS. YOU CAN STUFF A LOT IN ONE, THEY ARE EASILY PORTABLE FOR DOG WALKS AND MOST TIMES FIT INTO A JACKET POCKET.

    I ALSO USE THEM FOR STORING ELECTRIC OR BUNGEE CORDS

    ANOTHER USE IS TO SLIP YOUR ROUND HAIR STYLING BRUSH IN ONE TO PROTECT THE BRISSTLES.

  8. Anonymous says:

    I just used one to make a small trash can for our little ‘toilet room’ in our master bath. The bags for produce at the grocery store are the perfect trash bag for them.

    I spray painted it with oil rubbed bronze paint so it would match my bathroom.

  9. Ann says:

    We collected 25 of the large Clorox containers, removed the labels (easily come off), turned them upside down, put a overlapping circle of material on the bottom attached with hot glue and colored electrical tape and let 25 preschoolers decorate the white sides with markers and stickers making a drum for Bible School. They loved it! I also showed them it had a secret hidding place in the bottom (originally the top) where they could hide their treasures. This made them an even bigger hit with the kids.



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